Quercus utahensis (A. DC.) Rydb.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus utahensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-utahensis/). Accessed 21-6-2019.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Q. stellata var. utahensis A. DC.
  • Q. submollis Rydb.

Other species in genus

Glossary

acorn
Fruit of Quercus; a single-seeded nut set in a woody cupule.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus utahensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-utahensis/). Accessed 21-6-2019.

A deciduous tree 30 to 50 ft high; young shoots densely covered with yellowish-grey down, which on young plants persists until the end of the season. Leaves obovate in main outline, but deeply three- to five-lobed on each side, the lobes penetrating from half-way almost up to the midrib, and the larger middle lobes again lobed; the apex of the lobes may be either rounded or pointed; 3 to 5 in. long, 114 to 3 in. wide (in young vigorous plants larger), dark shining green and almost glabrous above, dull, pale, and persistently downy beneath; stalk 14 to 58 in. long. Fruits solitary or in pairs; acorn 12 to 34 in. long, broadly egg-shaped; the cup, which encloses the lower one-third, is covered with short, appressed, downy scales.

Native of the S.W. United States; introduced to Kew in 1912. Among other places it is wild in the Grand Canyon, Arizona. The dense soft down, especially of the shoots and undersurface of the leaves, is a marked character and the lustrous dark green of its leaves gives it a handsome appearance. It is one of the ‘white’ oaks of N. America.

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