Quercus uxoris McVaugh

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus uxoris' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-uxoris/). Accessed 2019-10-15.

Genus

  • Quercus
  • Subgen. Quercus, Sect. Lobatae

Other species in genus

Glossary

acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus uxoris' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-uxoris/). Accessed 2019-10-15.

Tree to 25 m, 1 m dbh. Branchlets covered in thick golden tomentum, which erodes later; lenticels prominent. Leaves deciduous, (10–)15–26 × (3.5–)6–10 cm, ovate or obovate to elliptic, leathery, juvenile foliage with glandular hairs and stellate pubescence, hairs dense and golden on the lower surface and sparse on the upper surface, mature leaves largely glabrous or with stellate hairs on the veins of the lower leaf surface, 11–14 secondary veins on each side of the midrib, margins revolute, with 10–14 teeth on each side of the midrib, lateral veins terminating in a bristle, apex acuminate to attenuate; petiole (0.8–)1.2–3 cm long. Infructescence 1–4 cm long with one to several cupules. Cupule saucer-shaped, 2–2.2 × 0.8 cm; scales grey and triangular. Acorn ovoid, with one-quarter to one-third of its length enclosed in the cupule, 1.8–3 cm long, stylopodium small. Muller & McVaugh 1972, Gonzalez & Labat 1987. Distribution MEXICO: Colima, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacán, Oaxaca. Habitat Pine-oak or oak forests in steep valleys between 900 and 2500 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone (9–)10. Conservation status Vulnerable. The range of Q. uxoris has not been fully documented and the rate of forest clearance is alarming. Illustration Gonzalez & Labat 1987.

Introduced from Jalisco by Allen Coombes in 1995, Quercus uxoris has proved to be too tender to grow outside at Chevithorne Barton, but is maintained under glass there (M. Heathcoat Amory, collection notes). Neither has it survived with Shaun Haddock in southern France. It has distinctively long leaves with long-acuminate tips.


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