Quercus wislizenii A. DC.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus wislizenii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-wislizenii/). Accessed 2019-12-15.

Genus

Other species in genus

Glossary

acorn
Fruit of Quercus; a single-seeded nut set in a woody cupule.
convex
Having a rounded surface.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
stellate
Star-shaped.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus wislizenii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-wislizenii/). Accessed 2019-12-15.

An evergreen oak, varying in the wild from a mere shrub to a tree 70 or more ft high; young shoots furnished with a loose, scattered, starry down. Leaves oblong to ovate, rounded or slightly heart-shaped at the base, terminated and edged with slender, spiny teeth, 1 to 234 in. long, 12 to 134 in. wide, often entire on adult native trees, both sides shining green and quite glabrous; stalk 18 to 14 in. long, downy, the stellate down often continued down the midrib. Acorn 34 to over 1 in. long, about 13 in. wide, two-thirds enclosed in a cup with thin, downy, flattened scales, ripening the second year.

Native of California; introduced to Kew in 1874, where it has proved hardy but slow-growing. It has also borne acorns there. In its glossy green leaves, glabrous on both surfaces, it resembles only Q. coccifera, but the tree is of much more open habit, and the leaves are larger. Henry has also pointed out differences in the shape of the buds; in Q. wislizenii they are conical, pointed, and longer than the rounded blunt ones of Q. coccifera. In the allied Q. agrifolia the leaves are convex above, with conspicuous tufts of hairs in the vein-axils beneath, and the fruits ripen in one season.

The example at Kew, pl. 1874, measures 40 × 212 ft (1973). It has spiny leaves, but on a tree in the Sunningdale Nurseries, about 35 ft high, they are almost entire.


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