Rhododendron intranervatum Sleumer

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'Rhododendron intranervatum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-intranervatum/). Accessed 2020-05-31.

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New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron intranervatum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-intranervatum/). Accessed 2020-05-31.

Shrub to 1 m, usually epiphytic, also on cliffs; minutely scaly at first quickly becoming smooth and glabrescent. Leaves 9-15 x 6-11 cm, broadly elliptic, sub-ovate occasionally subcircular or sub-obovate, the apex broadly obtuse, rounded or retuse, often with a small hard recurved apiculus, margin recurved, the base cordate to auriculate; upper surface minutely and obscurely pale brown stellate-scaly, the midrib strongly raised for 1/2 to 2/3 of the length, lateral veins 10-16 pairs, strongly raised and with the lamina deeply sulcate between so that the leaves are more distinctively ‘ribbed’ than any other species; lower surface with the midrib strongly raised and the laterals deeply impressed, scales rather dense, brown-lobed to stellate with small centres. Flowers 1-5 per umbel, semi erect to horizontal; calyx a low scaly disc, corolla pale yellow, broadly funnel-shaped, glabrous outside; stamens 10, spreading all round the mouth of the flower; ovary softly white-hairy, the style glabrous. Royal Horticultural Society (1997

Distribution  Indonesia W Kalimantan Malaysia S Sarawak

Habitat 60-1,100 m

RHS Hardiness Rating H2

Conservation status Vulnerable (VU)

This species is grown as much for its bizarre looking leaves as for the flowers. If grown in full sun the leaves become very pale yellowish in colour often with a bronze tinge which makes it either wonderfully exciting or sick-looking depending on the viewpoint of the observer. If grown in shade the plants are quite acceptably green and growth better. Royal Horticultural Society (1997)


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