Rhododendron longesquamatum Schneid.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron longesquamatum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-longesquamatum/). Accessed 2020-01-25.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. brettii Hemsl. & Wils.

Other species in genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bud
Immature shoot protected by scales that develops into leaves and/or flowers.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
petaloid
Petal-like. May refer to sepals or stamens modified into a petal-like form.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron longesquamatum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-longesquamatum/). Accessed 2020-01-25.

Shrub, 3-4 m; young shoots and petioles densely rufous tomentose. Leaves 6-11 x 2-3.5 cm, elliptic to oblanceolate, apex shortly cuspidate, upper surface shortly stalked-glandular and rufous-tomentose when young; lower surface ultimately with lamina glabrous though with a rufous tomentum composed of flagellate hairs covering the midrib. Flowers 4-6, in a lax truss; calyx 6-10 mm, lobes lingulate; corolla rose-pink, with a basal blotch, open-campanulate, without nectar pouches, 40-45 mm; ovary and lower half of style stalked-glandular. Flowering May. Royal Horticultural Society (1997)

Distribution  China Sichuan, Guizhou

Habitat 2,300-3,350 m

RHS Hardiness Rating H5

Conservation status Near threatened (NT)

Taxonomic note A distinctive species without close allies. Royal Horticultural Society (1997)

An evergreen bush up to 12 ft or so high; young shoots stout, clothed thickly with brown, shaggy, branched hairs, and long, dark bud-scales, which persist for two or more seasons. Leaves oblong, inclined to obovate, pointed at the apex, rounded or slightly heart-shaped at the base, 212 to 5 in. long, 1 to 134 in. wide, dark green and glabrous except for the midrib, which is shaggy beneath like the young shoots and leaf-stalks – the latter about 12 in. long; underside of blade dotted with pustule-like glands. Flowers opening in May, ten or more in a truss on stalks up to 1 in. or slightly more long. Calyx-lobes 12 in. long, glandular, and hairy. Corolla bell-shaped, about 2 in. across, white or pink, with a dark red blotch. Stamens ten, downy at the base. Ovary densely glandular; style glandular at the base. Bot. Mag., t. 9430. (s. Barbatum ss. Maculiferum)

Native of W. Szechwan at 9,000 to 11,000 ft; discovered by Wilson and introduced by him in 1904. It is a very hardy and free-flowering species, remarkable for the stout, shaggy young shoots and the large, petaloid calyx. In a letter to Kew, F. R. S. Balfour of Dawyck remarked that garden warblers often build their nests among its hairy twigs and leaves.


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