Rhododendron stamineum Franch.

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Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron stamineum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-stamineum/). Accessed 2020-05-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. pittosporaefolium Hemsl.

Other species in genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
axil
Angle between the upper side of a leaf and the stem.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
exserted
Protruding; pushed out.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
oblanceolate
Inversely lanceolate; broadest towards apex.
reflexed
Folded backwards.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron stamineum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-stamineum/). Accessed 2020-05-28.

Shrub or small tree, to 13 m. Leaves 6-14 x 2-4.5 cm, elliptic to oblanceolate, apex acuminate. Flowers 3-5 (occasionally to 8), clustered at end of a leafy shoot below a vegetative bud, white orpink, with yellow blotch, funnel-shaped; tube narrow, 10-15 mm; lobes narrowly oblong, spreading to reflexed; stamens 10, long-exserted. Flowering April-May. Royal Horticultural Society (1997)

Distribution  Myanmar NE China SW, S & C

Habitat 400-1,450 m

RHS Hardiness Rating H3

Awards AM 1971 (Crown Estate Commissioners, Windsor); flowers white, upper lobe flushed yellow-orange.

Conservation status Least concern (LC)

Taxonomic note Rare in cultivation, this species is distinguished from the allied R. moulmainense by the long-exserted stamens and the reflexed corolla lobes. Royal Horticultural Society (1997)

An evergreen shrub 6 to 15 ft high; young shoots glabrous, slender, brown. Leaves clustered at the end of the twig, narrowly oval to oblanceolate, abruptly but sharply pointed, tapered at the base, of stiff texture, 2 to 4 in. long, 1 to 112 in. wide, dark shining green above, paler beneath, quite glabrous: stalk 14 to 12 in. long. Flowers fragrant, produced in April or May in clusters of three or four, each cluster springing from an axil of one of the leaves which are crowded near the end of the shoot. Calyx with five glabrous, narrow, bluntish lobes up to 18 in. long; flower-stalk 34 in. long. Corolla white, stained with yellow on the three upper lobes, funnel-shaped with a slender tube, spreading into five recurved lobes, and 1 to 2 in. wide. Stamens ten, if to 2 in. long, standing out far beyond the corolla, with some white down near the base. Ovary glabrous or slightly downy; style rather longer than the stamens and quite glabrous. Bot. Mag., t. 8601. (s. Stamineum).

Native of western and central China; discovered by Père Delavay in 1882 in N.E. Yunnan, near the border with Szechwan. Wilson collected seeds in Hupeh for Messrs Veitch in the autumn of 1900, and a plant raised from these flowered at Caerhays in 1911. He reintroduced it in 1910, during his second expedition for the Arnold Arboretum, this time from Mt Omei in W. Szechwan. According to Wilson it is a low-level rhododendron, growing at 4,000 to 6,000 ft, and usually found in hot, moist valleys among other shrubs, most of them evergreen.

R. stamineum is the type of an interesting series, further discussed on page 588. It received an Award of Merit as a shrub for the cool greenhouse when exhibited by the Crown Estate Commissioners, Windsor Great Park, on May 24, 1971, but there is a plant at Wakehurst Place, Sussex, 10 ft high in a sheltered place.


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