Rhododendron tschonoskii Maxim.

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Kindly sponsored by Peter Norris, enabling the use of The Rhododendron Handbook 1998

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron tschonoskii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-tschonoskii/). Accessed 2020-05-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. trinerve Franch.
  • Azalea tschonoskii (Maxim.) O. Kuntze

Other species in genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
linear
Strap-shaped.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron tschonoskii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-tschonoskii/). Accessed 2020-05-28.

A semi-evergreen azalea 2 ft or perhaps more high, with rather horizontal branches, the young shoots covered with appressed, dark brown, linear bristles pointing towards the end of the shoot. Leaves in a tuft at the end of the twig, 13 to 112 in. long, 16 to 58 in. wide, oval, tapering and pointed, upper surface dull, dark green, lower one pale, both covered with bristly hairs. Flowers produced two to six together, each on a bristly stalk so short that the flower is almost hidden in the tuft of leaves. Calyx minute, covered with bristles. Corolla white, about 12 in. across, funnel-shaped. Stamens five. Ovary densely clad with brown bristles; style glabrous. (s. Azalea ss. Obtusum)

Native of Japan, Sakhalin, and Korea; introduced by Maries in 1878. This curious little azalea is only worth cultivating for the orange-red of its fading leaves. The flowers are insignificant.


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