Rhus vernix L.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhus vernix' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhus/rhus-vernix/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

Genus

Common Names

  • Poison Sumach

Synonyms

  • R. venenata DC.

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhus vernix' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhus/rhus-vernix/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

A small deciduous tree up to 20 ft high, with a trunk 15 to 18 in. thick, usually much smaller in England, and often breaking near the ground into two or three stems; branchlets glabrous and grey. Leaves pinnate, with purplish stalks, quite glabrous except when young; leaflets nine to thirteen, 2 to 4 in. long, one-third as much wide, ovate or obovate, entire. Flowers 18 in. across, greenish yellow, produced on thin, slender panicles 4 to 8 in. long from the leaf-axils of the current season’s growth. Fruits the size of a peppercorn, yellowish white, and hanging in a cluster of graceful panicles from near the end of the branchlets.

Native of the eastern United States; cultivated in England since early in the 18th century. Few of the sumachs are more beautiful than this in their autumn tints, the foliage putting on brilliant shades of orange and scarlet before it falls. Yet it is not much grown in this country, and perhaps wisely so, for it is one of the most dangerous hardy trees in cultivation, owing to the toxic properties of its sap – even, it is said, of its exhalations! The latter may be doubtful; but all that has been said as to the need of care in dealing with R. radicans applies with equal, if not greater, force to this species. It appears with both that persons in a state of perspiration are most susceptible to their effects. It flowers in July, and the fruit often remains throughout the winter.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.