Ribes speciosum Pursh

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ribes speciosum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ribes/ribes-speciosum/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. fuchsioides Berland.

Glossary

receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
reflexed
Folded backwards.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ribes speciosum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ribes/ribes-speciosum/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

A deciduous spiny shrub 6 to 12 ft high, the young shoots furnished with gland-tipped bristles. Leaves three- sometimes five-lobed, sparsely toothed, and from 34 to 114 in. long and wide, with smaller ones often obovate and tapered at the base; usually quite glabrous; stalk slender, scarcely as long as the blade, with a few glandular bristles, especially at the base. Flowers rich red, usually two to five in pendulous clusters, the main-stalk longer and less glandular than the minor ones. Receptacle 12 in. long, glandular; sepals four, not reflexed; petals four, about as long as the sepals; stamens four, red, standing out 34 in. beyond the receptacle. Fruits glandular-bristly, red, 12 in. long, sometimes seen in this country. Bot. Mag., t. 3530.

Native of California; discovered by Menzies about 1793, and introduced from Monterey by a naval surgeon named Collie in 1828. As a flowering shrub it is the most beautiful of the gooseberries. Its young shoots are reddish, horizontal, or slightly dependent, and from their underside the richly coloured, fuchsia-like blossoms hang profusely in rows during April and May. It is very distinct in the parts of the flower being in fours (not the usual fives), and in the very long highly coloured stamens. It is one of the earliest shrubs to break into leaf – often in early February. It shows to best advantage perhaps against a wall, where it will grow 10 or 12 ft high, but is quite hardy in the open at Kew, where it has grown 6 or 7 ft high. It can be rooted from cuttings, but does not strike readily; layering is a more certain process.

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