Rosa albertii Reg.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa albertii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-albertii/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
ellipsoid
An elliptic solid.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa albertii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-albertii/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

A shrub 2 to 4 ft high, the stems armed with numerous, straight, needle-like prickles. Leaves 1 to; in. long, composed of five to nine leaflets, which are ovate, obovate, or roundish, 14 to 114 in. long, sharply toothed, the teeth usually compound-glandular, glabrous above, minutely downy beneath; rachis downy and glandular. Flowers white, 112 in. across, solitary. Pedicels glandular. Sepals lanceolate, glabrous outside. Fruits about 34 in. long, shortly stalked, slenderly pear-shaped or ellipsoid, shedding when ripe both the sepals and the top of the receptacle.

Native of Russia in the Altai Mountains and Central Asia; discovered by Albert Regel in 1877, introduced by him to the St Petersburg Botanic Garden, and named after him by his father. Although resembling R. pimpinellifolia in some characters, it is nearer to R. beggeriana, with which it has in common the peculiar fruits, devoid both of calyx and disk when ripe.

Plants at one time cultivated as R. albertii were wrongly named, and near to R. ecae. The rose portrayed as R. albertii in Willmott, The Genus Rosa, p. 319, t., is also wrongly named.