Rosa arkansana Porter

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa arkansana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-arkansana/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. blanda var. arkansana (Porter) Best

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa arkansana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-arkansana/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

A suckering shrub up to 3 or 4 ft high, in the wild often a subshrub cut to the ground each winter; stems clad with slender, straight prickles and bristles, sometimes very densely so. Leaflets nine or eleven, more rarely seven, elliptic or sometimes obovate, 1 to 2 in. long, lustrous above, glabrous on both sides except for the sometimes downy veins beneath, edged with fairly deep, simple, eglandular teeth. Flowers pink, about 112 in. across, borne around midsummer in lateral clusters, or later at the end of strong growths from the base. Pedicels and receptacle glabrous, sometimes slightly glandular. Sepals narrow, slenderly pointed, sometimes glandular on the back. Fruits globose to pear-shaped, about 12 in. wide, smooth or slightly glandular, crowned by the usually spreading sepals.

Native of the central USA from Wisconsin and Minnesota to Colorado and Kansas.


var. suffulta (Greene) Cockerell

Synonyms
R. suffulta Greene
R. pratincola Greene
R. heliophila Greene
R. arkansoides Schneid

Rachis and underside of leaflets downy. More widely distributed than the typical state and extending into Canada.R. arkansana has never been much cultivated in Britain, but it is an interesting rose owing to its ability to flower on strong shoots of the current season, and is by all accounts a pretty one, especially its var. suffulta, of which there are forms with white and with deep pink flowers, and two named clones with double flowers – ‘Woodrow’ and ‘John Allen’. Some hybrids have been raised from the var. suffulta in the USA.R. alcea Greene is closely allied to R. arkansana var. suffulta, but more glandular. Another ally of R. arkansana is the Californian R. spithamea S. Wats.

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