Rosa beggeriana Schrenk ex Fisch. & Mey.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa beggeriana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-beggeriana/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. anserinaefolia Boiss.

Glossary

acute
Sharply pointed.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa beggeriana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-beggeriana/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

A shrub 6 to 10 ft high; stems and branches armed with light-coloured, hooked spines. Leaflets usually seven or nine, 38 to 114 in. long, oval to slightly obovate, grey-green and glabrous above, usually glandular and sometimes downy beneath, edged with ten to twenty simple or compound teeth. Flower-buds elongate, acute. Flowers white, 1 to 112 in. across, in clusters of nine or more, produced from midsummer onwards at the ends of the new shoots. Pedicels slender, to about 1 in. long, glabrous or downy, sometimes glandular. Fruits globose, smooth, red at first, finally purplish, 14 to 38 in. long, sepals at length falling away together with the top of the receptacle.

Native of Central and S.W. Asia (including Asiatic Turkey); introduced about 1881. It is a variable species, of which one botanist described or recognised fifty varieties. The cultivated form is of some value for its greyish leaves with a sweet brier fragrance, but the flowers are unpleasantly scented. For the fruits see further under R. gymnocarpa.