Rosa corymbulosa Rolfe

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa corymbulosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-corymbulosa/). Accessed 2022-08-09.

Genus

Glossary

receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
glandular
Bearing glands.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa corymbulosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-corymbulosa/). Accessed 2022-08-09.

A deciduous shrub up to 6 ft high; young shoots not downy, becoming brown with age, usually unarmed or sometimes with a few scattered, mostly solitary prickles which are straight, slender, and 14 in. or less long. Leaves 2 to 5 in. long, consisting of three or five leaflets; rachis downy, glandular, furnished with a few tiny prickles. Leaflets ovate-oblong (the side ones stalkless), pointed, often doubly toothed, 12 to 2 in. long, 14 to 1 in. wide, dark green above, glaucous and downy beneath. Stipules edged with tiny glands. Flowers produced during July in corymbs of up to a dozen blossoms, each 34 to 1 in. across and borne on a slender glandular stalk 34 to 112in. long. Petals inversely heart-shaped, deep rose-pink, paling towards the base; anthers golden yellow. Receptacle obovoid, glandular. Sepals 13 to 34 in. long, downy, often widening at the apex. Fruits globose, 14 to 13 in. wide, coral-red, crowned by the persistent sepals. Bot. Mag., t. 8566.

Native of China, in the province of Hupeh, whence it was introduced to cultivation by Wilson in 1907, and of Shensi. It is a pretty rose both in flower and in fruit, distinct in its almost spineless branchlets and small flowers, which are normally borne in small separate clusters, not in a large compound inflorescence as shown in the Botanical Magazine. The leaves turn purplish red beneath in autumn.