Rosa elymaitica Boiss.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa elymaitica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-elymaitica/). Accessed 2022-08-09.

Genus

Glossary

receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa elymaitica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-elymaitica/). Accessed 2022-08-09.

A low, compact bush, whose stems are armed with stout, pale-coloured, very hooked prickles, 14 to 13 in. long, some of which are arranged in pairs at the base of the leaf-stalks, some scattered. Leaves 1 to 2 in. long; leaflets mostly five, 13 to 12 in. long, oval or roundish, simply and coarsely toothed, downy above, felted beneath, of firm texture. Flowers rosy white, about 1 in. across, usually solitary on short, bristly stalks. Receptacle and sepals bristly. Fruits globose, 13 in. wide, dark red, glandular-bristly, crowned with the spreading sepals.

A little known species ranging from the mountains of Iran west to southern Transcaucasia, not closely allied to any other species. Crépin placed it in the Caninae, but all members of that group are polyploids of hybrid origin, whereas R. elymaitica is diploid. In the cultivated plant described above the leaflets are hairy on both sides, but they may be more or less glabrous. R. elymaitica was introduced to Kew in 1900 and proved hardy, but is no longer cultivated there.