Rosa gymnocarpa Torr. & Gr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa gymnocarpa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-gymnocarpa/). Accessed 2022-08-09.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
ellipsoid
An elliptic solid.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
obtuse
Blunt.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
section
(sect.) Subdivision of a genus.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa gymnocarpa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-gymnocarpa/). Accessed 2022-08-09.

A shrub usually 2 to 5 ft high in the wild, though said occasionally to attain 10 ft; stems slender, with straight, needle-like prickles often intermixed with bristles, sometimes almost unarmed. Leaflets five or seven, less commonly nine, 38 to 34 in. long, elliptic to ovate or roundish, usually obtuse at the apex, sometimes slightly glandular beneath, teeth usually compound, glandular or not. Flowers rosy pink, 1 to 112 in. across, solitary or two to four in a cluster. Pedicels glandular rosy pink, 1 to 112 in. across, solitary or two to four in a cluster. Pedicels glandular-bristly, up to 1 in. long. Sepals glabrous and usually eglandular, 14 to barely 12 in. long, triangular or ovate, with a slender prolongation. Fruits smooth, red, globose, pear-shaped or ellipsoid, to about 38 in. long; sepals, disk and styles deciduous from the ripe fruit.

Native of western North America; introduced about 1893. This pretty and graceful rose is the type of the mainly Asiatic section or subsection Gymnocarpae, characterised by the shedding of the entire top of the receptacle from the ripe fruit. It is closely allied to R. willmottiae and difficult to distinguish from R. fargesiana, a Chinese species not described here. Other species in this group are R. beggeriana and R. albertii.

This species is studied by G. A. Boulenger in Bull. Jard. Bot. Brux., Vol. 14 (1937), pp. 279-88.