Rosa jundzillii Besser

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa jundzillii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-jundzillii/). Accessed 2022-08-08.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. marginata of some authors, not Wallr.
  • R. trachyphylla Rau

Glossary

acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
acute
Sharply pointed.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa jundzillii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-jundzillii/). Accessed 2022-08-08.

An erect shrub to about 8 ft high, though usually not much more than half that height, of suckering habit; stems and branches armed with scattered straight or slightly decurved prickles, only very rarely mixed with needles and bristles. Leaflets of firm texture, five or seven, rarely nine, 1 to 134 in. long, elliptic to broadly so, usually acute or acuminate, glabrous above, more or less glandular and sometimes downy beneath, teeth compound-glandular, up to thirty on each side; rachis and petiole glandular, with or without down. Flowers in June or July, up to 3 in. across, light to rich rosy pink, produced singly or in twos or threes, sometimes in corymbs of up to eight. Pedicels up to 112 in. long, clad with glandular bristles or needles which sometimes extend on to the receptacle. Sepals glandular on the back, the outer ones with up to six long lateral gland-edged appendages. Stigmas hairy, united into a large, rounded head. Fruits globose or slightly egg-shaped, bright red, shedding the sepals when fully ripe.

Native of Europe from central France eastward through Central Europe and N.W. Italy to the Balkans and S.W. European Russia; and of Asia Minor and the Caucasus. The plants of western Europe received many names before it was discovered that they belonged to this species, first described from the Ukraine early in the 19th century. R. jundzillii is one of the most distinctive and handsome of the European roses. Boulenger points out that it is really quite near to R. gallica and sometimes difficult to distinguish from hybrids between that species and R. canina. Although glandular, it is not aromatic, or at the most faintly turpentine-scented, and this character suffices to distinguish it from the sweet brier, to which it bears a superficial resemblance. It was at one time thought to be a native of Britain, but the plants so identified are a form of R. tomentosa.