Rosa nitida Willd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa nitida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-nitida/). Accessed 2022-08-08.

Genus

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
reflexed
Folded backwards.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa nitida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-nitida/). Accessed 2022-08-08.

A low bush, rarely more than 2 ft high, freely suckering, with erect, often reddish stems, densely furnished with prickly bristles. Leaves 2 to 3 in. long, very shining green, becoming purplish red in autumn; stipules with glandular-toothed margins. Leaflets five to nine, narrow oblong, tapering at both ends, from 12 in. to 114 in. long, one-quarter to one-third as wide, finely and sharply toothed, glabrous all over, and of firm texture. Flowers bright rosy red, 2 to 212 in. across, usually solitary, occasionally two to three together; flower-stalks and sepals bristly or glandular, the latter entire, lanceolate, and reflexed. Fruits globose, 13 in. wide, scarlet, bristly, with the sepals fallen away.

Native of eastern N. America; introduced in 1807. A charming little rose, very distinct among dwarf kinds by its shining, narrow leaflets, its very prickly stems, and highly coloured flowers. The leaves turn bright red in autumn.