Rosa nutkana Presl

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa nutkana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-nutkana/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. fraxinifolia sens . Borrer in Hook.
  • Fl. Bor. Amer ., not Borkh.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
glandular
Bearing glands.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa nutkana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-nutkana/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

A robust shrub 6 to 10 ft high, its prickles stout, usually straight, with a broad flattened base, paired at the nodes, sometimes 12 in. long on the young barren stems, often absent from the flowering branchlets. Leaves 3 to 5 in. long; rachis glandular. Leaflets five to nine, elliptic or ovate, 34 to 2 in. long, typically edged with compound glandular teeth (but see var. hispida), glandular and sometimes downy beneath. Flowers solitary or in twos or threes, bright red, 2 to 212 in. across. Receptacles and pedicels smooth or glandular-bristly. Sepals 1 to 112 in. long, narrow, with an expanded leaf-like apex, smooth or glandular-bristly and more or less downy. Fruits globose or orange-shaped, red, 12 to 58 in. wide, crowned with the long, erect sepals.

Native of western N. America; described in 1851 from a specimen collected on Nutka Sound in 1791 by Haenke, botanist on the Malaspina expedition; specimens collected later by Menzies, Douglas and others were identified as R. fraxinifolia, which, in Lindley’s sense, is R. blanda. There appears to be no record of its cultivation in Britain before 1884. It is a handsome wild rose, perhaps the handsomest of W. American species, and flowers and fruits well in this country.


var. hispida Fern.

Synonyms
R. spaldingii Crép.
R. macdougalii Holzinger

Leaflets simply toothed and eglandular. Prickles weaker, not much enlarged or flattened at the base. Of more easterly distribution than the typical state and in places intergrading with it (Cronquist in Hitchcock et al., Vasc. Pl. Pacif. Northwest, Part 3 (1961), p. 170). Introduced to Kew before 1905.’Cantab’ (p. 175) is a hybrid of R. nutkana.