Rosa sicula Tratt.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa sicula' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-sicula/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

Genus

Glossary

compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa sicula' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-sicula/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

A close-habited, densely branched shrub of rounded habit, 2 to 5 ft high, its branches set with slender, curved (not strongly hooked) prickles of varying lengths, the longest about 14 in. long, rarely mixed with needles and glandular bristles, though more commonly so on the strong growths. Leaves 112 to 2 in. long, composed of five to seven leaflets which are broadly ovate or round, 14 to 34 in. long, compound-toothed and with glands on the teeth, lower surface, rachis and stipules. Flowers 1 to 114 in. across, bright rose, usually solitary, sometimes two or three together. Pedicels smooth or glandular-bristly, sometimes downy, very short. Sepals lanceolate, with a few lateral appendages and glandular, ciliated margins. Styles downy. Fruits about the size of a large pea, red, finally black, crowned with the sepals. Bot. Mag., t. 7761.

Native of the Mediterranean region, including N.W. Africa. A neat and pleasing little rose, seldom seen in gardens but quite hardy. It resembles R. biebersteinii (horrida) in its dwarf habit, small leaves and abundant spines, but differs in the particulars pointed out under that species. It is very similar to and confused with R. serafinii Viv., which differs from R. sicula in its hooked prickles and glabrous styles.