Rosa × hibernica Sm.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa × hibernica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-x-hibernica/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

Genus

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rosa × hibernica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rosa/rosa-x-hibernica/). Accessed 2022-01-24.

A shrub 6 to 9 ft high in gardens, with erect stems and arching branches armed with scattered prickles, the sucker shoots usually very freely furnished with prickles and bristles. Leaflets five to nine, oval or ovate, simply toothed, 34 to 1 in. long, downy beneath, especially on the midrib. Flowers pink, usually one to three in a cluster (sometimes more), each on a glabrous stalk and 112 in. across. Sepals with an expanded leaflike tip, more or less pinnately lobed. Fruits globose, 12 in. in diameter, red, crowned with the persisting sepals.

This interesting rose is a hybrid between R. pimpinellifolia (seed-parent) and the downy state of R. canina (sometimes separated from it under the name R. dumetorum Thuill. or R. corymbifera Borkh.). First discovered near Belfast, in 1802, by John Templeton (who thereby won a prize of five guineas for the discovery of a new Irish plant), this hybrid has since been found in a few other localities in the British Isles.

R. pimpinellifolia crosses with other members of the R. canina complex. The hybrid between it and R. canina sens. strict. was found in the last century growing near London on Ham Common and Barnes Common (R. × hibernica var. grovesii Baker). The rose named R. × hibernica var. glabra by Baker is now thought to be R. pimpinellifolia × R. afzeliana.