Rubus adenophorus Rolfe

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus adenophorus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-adenophorus/). Accessed 2022-10-02.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus adenophorus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-adenophorus/). Accessed 2022-10-02.

A robust shrub, deciduous, 8 ft or more high; stems erect or arching towards the top, stout, armed with stiff, short, broad-based spines, densely clothed with bristles, and with stalked glands. Leaves of the first-year (or barren) shoots mostly pinnate, 8 to 12 in. long, with five leaflets, those of the flowering shoots shorter, with three leaflets or sometimes simple. Leaflets obliquely obovate or ovate, 2 to 5 in. long, 114 to 312 in. wide, tapered, rounded, or heart-shaped at the base, slender-pointed, sharply and doubly toothed, dull and hairy on both sides; main-stalk bristly and furnished with stalked glands like the shoots. Flowers produced in July in terminal, cylindrical panicles 4 to 5 in. long, the petals pink, toothed, the flower-stalks and calyx densely clothed with bristles and stalked glands. Fruits black, about 12 in. wide, edible.

Native of Central China; introduced by Wilson in 1907. The most remarkable feature of this bramble are the conspicuous dark glands, resembling minute black-headed pins, stuck among the bristles on the stems and leaf-stalks, but extraordinarily abundant on the sepals and flower-stalks. The leaf next to the panicle is often simple.