Rubus amabilis Focke

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus amabilis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-amabilis/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Glossary

midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus amabilis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-amabilis/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

A deciduous shrub up to 6 or 7 ft high; young shoots slightly downy and armed with small prickles. Leaves pinnate, 4 to 8 in. long, composed of seven to eleven leaflets; main-stalk prickly. Leaflets very shortly stalked, ovate, pointed, sharply and doubly toothed, 34 to 2 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide (terminal one larger), usually downy on the veins and armed with a few prickles on the midrib. Flowers white, 112 to 2 in. wide, solitary at the end of short leafy twigs, petals overlapping. Fruits conical, red, edible, 58 in. long.

Native of W. China; discovered and introduced by Wilson in 1908. This rubus is distinct in its graceful habit, its handsome, much laciniated leaves, and its large solitary flowers which open in June and July.