Rubus calycinoides Koidz.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus calycinoides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-calycinoides/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. fockeanus Hort., not Kurz

Glossary

ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
cordate
Heart-shaped (i.e. with two equal lobes at the base).
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
prostrate
Lying flat.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus calycinoides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-calycinoides/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

An evergreen, prostrate, spreading shrub, self-rooting freely from branches on the ground; young shoots, leaf-stalks, underside of leaves and flower-stalks all covered densely with pale down. Leaves 12 to 112 in. long, broadly ovate to cordate, three-lobed, the lobes rounded, toothed, very much wrinkled, the dense network of veins sunken above, prominent beneath; stalks 14 to 113 in. long, sparsely prickly. Flowers 58 in. across, solitary or in pairs, terminal mostly on short, leafy, lateral shoots; petals white, roundish, minutely ciliate; sepals large, downy, their lobes toothed. Fruits scarlet, 58 in. long, style and ring of stamens persisting. Bot. Mag., t. 9644.

Native of Formosa; introduced by the late Lord Headfort from seed collected by a Japanese. It is quite hardy and without being in any way showy it flowers and develops fruits every year and makes an interesting firmly matted ground-cover several feet across.

Until Messrs Hillier pointed out the error in their Manual R. calycinoides was grown as R. fockeanus, a quite different species, for which see under R. nepalensis.

Note. The name R. calycinoides, proposed by Hayata and published by Koidzumi in 1917, is unfortunately invalid, having been applied earlier by O. Kuntze to an Indian Species. Furthermore, the Formosan R. calycinoides is probably no more than a small-leaved variety of R. pentalobus Hayata, described, also from Formosa, in 1908.