Rubus cockburnianus Hemsl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus cockburnianus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-cockburnianus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Rosmarinus giraldianus Focke

Glossary

inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus cockburnianus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-cockburnianus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

A vigorous deciduous shrub up to 8 or 10 ft high, its biennial stems much branched towards the summit, pendulous at the ends, covered with a vividly white, waxy covering, not downy, armed rather sparely with broad-based spines. Leaves pinnate, consisting of usually nine leaflets, and from 5 to 8 in. long, the main-stalk downy, and armed with hooked spines. Leaflets 112 to 212 in. long, 34 to 114 in. wide, the terminal one the largest, ovate or rather diamond-shaped, lateral ones oval-lanceolate, all unequally and rather coarsely toothed, slender-pointed, glabrous above, white beneath with a close felt. Inflorescence a terminal panicle; the flowers small and of little beauty, purple. Fruits black.

Native of China; first found in W. Szechwan by A. E. Pratt; introduced by Wilson in 1907. Its claims to recognition in the garden are its remarkably white stems, which are as notable in this respect as those of R. biflorus, and its arching, pendulous branches, which give a remarkable fountain-like aspect to the shrub.


'Goldenvale'

Awards
AGM

A golden-leaved selection, useful for its summer effect as well as the white-washed winter stems.