Rubus henryi Hemsl. & Kuntze

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus henryi' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-henryi/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

Genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus henryi' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-henryi/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

An evergreen, elegant, scandent shrub, growing 20 ft high where support is available; stems slender, cord-like, armed with a few spines. Leaves three-lobed, 4 to 6 in. long, glabrous above, covered beneath with a close white felt; stalk 1 to 112 in. long; lobes of varying depth but usually reaching about three-fourths down the blade, narrow (from 34 to 1 in. wide at the base), tapering to a long fine point, finely toothed. Flowers pink, of little beauty, 34 in. across, borne six to ten together in terminal and axillary racemes 3 in. or so long; petals and sepals of about equal length, the latter covered with glandular hairs, and ending in a tail-like point. Fruits shining black, 12 in. wide.

Native of Central and W. China; first discovered near Ichang by Henry, in whose honour it is named. Introduced by Wilson in 1900. It is mainly represented in cultivation by:


var. bambusarum (Focke) Rehd.

Synonyms
R. bambusarum Focke

Leaves composed of three distinct leaflets, which are narrowly lanceolate, 2{1/2} to 5 in. long, {3/8} to {3/4} in. wide, on stalks {1/8} in. or less long. Native of Central China and, like the typical state, discovered by Henry and introduced by Wilson in 1900. It is notable for its elegant and rapid growth. When trained up a pillar or similar support, its slender branches arch outwards in all directions. Growths 10 to 12 ft long are made in one season. The panicles of black fruits, 3 to 5 in. long, are also handsome. Bot. Mag., n.s., t. 33. It is perfectly hardy and received a First Class Certificate when exhibited by Messrs Veitch in 1907.