Rubus hupehensis Oliver

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus hupehensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-hupehensis/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. swinhoei of early editions, not Hance

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glandular
Bearing glands.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
prostrate
Lying flat.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus hupehensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-hupehensis/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

A prostrate or climbing evergreen shrub, with round, slender, dark-coloured stems, thinly furnished with a cobweb-like down when young, and armed with a few small decurved spines. Leaves simple, oblong-lanceolate; 3 to 412 in. long, by about 112 in. wide; the base rounded, the apex long-pointed, margins finely toothed; veins in nine to twelve pairs; upper surface smooth except for tiny bristles along the veins, lower one covered with a close grey felt; leaf-stalk 14 to 12 in. long. Flowers usually three to seven in short, terminal, very glandular racemes, of little or no beauty; calyx covered with grey felt like the leaves; petals soon falling. Fruits described as at first red, then black-purple, austere.

Native of Central China; originally described in 1899, but introduced to gardens by Wilson from Hupeh in 1907. The foliage is handsome, and distinct from that of any other cultivated species except R. malifolius; the inflorescence also is conspicuous in its glandular hairiness.