Rubus illecebrosus Focke

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus illecebrosus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-illecebrosus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. rosaefolius var. coronarius f. simpliciflorus Mak.
  • R. commersonii var. illecebrosus (Focke) Mak.
  • R. sorbifolius Hort., not Maxim.

Glossary

acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
ellipsoid
An elliptic solid.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus illecebrosus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-illecebrosus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

A subshrub with creeping, underground stems, sending up green annual flowering shoots 2 to 3 ft high, which are glabrous, angled, and armed with curved prickles. Leaves pinnately compound; leaflets mostly five or seven, lanceolate, 1 to 3 in. long, 12 to 78 in. wide, acuminate, glabrous or slightly downy above, usually downy on the veins beneath; rachis prickly. Flowers white, about 134 in. wide, borne in late summer in few-flowered bracted corymbs. Stamens numerous. Fruits red, round or broadly ellipsoid, about 114 in. wide, with numerous drupelets.

Native of Japan; introduced to the USA towards the end of the last century and thence to Europe. It is grown for its ornamental strawberry-like fruits, which are sweet but insipid, and is recorded as an escape from gardens on the continent and in N. America. Strictly it is not a shrub, as its woody stems creep underground, and the annual stems die back each winter.

R. illecebrosus is allied to the wide-ranging Asiatic R. rosiflorus Sm., of which a double-flowered form ‘Coronarius’ is sometimes grown in greenhouses.