Rubus kuntzeanus Hemsl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus kuntzeanus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-kuntzeanus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. innominatus var. kuntzeanus (Hemsl.) Bailey

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glandular
Bearing glands.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
leaflet
Leaf-like segment of a compound leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus kuntzeanus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-kuntzeanus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

A deciduous shrub, with erect, sturdy biennial stems, 6 to 10 ft high, branching towards the top, covered with soft, grey, velvety down, and armed with short broad-based, scattered prickles. Leaves from 6 to 12 in. long, composed of three or five (pinnately arranged) leaflets, the side ones of which are obliquely ovate, 2 to 4 in. long, 1 to 212 in. wide, fine-pointed, rounded at the base, irregularly toothed and very shortly stalked, slightly hairy and dark glossy green above, covered beneath with a close white felt, interspersed with hairs on the veins, terminal leaflet larger, broader, longer-stalked, often three-lobed, and heart-shaped at the base. The main-stalk has hooked prickles and is covered with the same velvety down as the stem. Flowers small (13 to 12 in. wide), produced in large terminal panicles, 1 to 112 ft long; petals pink and soon falling. Fruits orange-red, rounded, 12 to 34 in. wide, of good flavour.

Native of Central and W. China; first introduced to Kew by Henry from Ichang in 1886, but most of the plants now in cultivation were introduced by Wilson between 1900 and 1907. The species is of some promise as a fruit-bearer, but has little to recommend it for ornament. It has been confused with R. innominatus S. Moore, a species very closely allied, but distinct in its glandular stems, leaf-stalks, inflorescence, and calyx.