Rubus lambertianus Ser.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus lambertianus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-lambertianus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
linear
Strap-shaped.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus lambertianus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-lambertianus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

A straggling sub-evergreen shrub, with slender, four-angled stems viscous when young, and armed with short decurved spines. Leaves glossy green on both surfaces, simple, sometimes three-, or obscurely five-lobed, sometimes merely wavy; broadly ovate or triangular, 3 to 5 in. long, nearly as much wide at the heart-shaped base, toothed, slightly downy on the veins above, more so beneath; stalk 1 to 2 in. long; stipules 13 in. long, with usually five linear lobes. Flowers white, 13 in. across, produced in a terminal panicle 3 to 5 in. long, calyx segments downy, ovate-lanceolate. Fruits red, small.

Native of Central China; introduced by Wilson in 1907. It is a luxuriant, very leafy, scandent shrub, suitable for planting as a rough group in thin woodland.


var. glaber Hemsl.

Synonyms
R. hakonensis Franch. & Sav.
R. lambertianus subsp. hakonensis (Franch. & Sav.) Focke
R. lambertianus var. hakonensis (Franch. & Sav.) Rehd

Similar in habit to the above, stems round and like the leaves glabrous or nearly so. Fruits yellow. Native of Japan as well as China; introduced from the latter country by Wilson in 1907.