Rubus lasiostylus Focke

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus lasiostylus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-lasiostylus/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

Genus

Glossary

bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
leaflet
Leaf-like segment of a compound leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus lasiostylus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-lasiostylus/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

An erect-growing deciduous shrub, with biennial stems, 4 to 6 ft high, covered with a blue-white, waxy bloom, and closely set with bristle-like spines, 14 in. or less in length, not downy. Leaves composed of three or five leaflets, and on young vigorous plants as much as 14 in. long, but usually some 6 or 8 in. long; side leaflets ovate, 2 to 4 in. long, coarsely and unevenly toothed, very sparsely hairy above, covered with a close white felt beneath, terminal leaflet much larger especially in the trifoliolate leaves, often lobed, heart-shaped at the base. Flowers small, with reddish purple petals which are shorter than the calyx segments, and soon fall. Fruits 1 in. across, roundish, red, and downy, with an agreeable acid taste. Bot. Mag., t. 7426.

Native of Central China; originally discovered by Henry in Hupeh and introduced by him to Kew in 1889; it was later reintroduced by Wilson from the same province. It is one of the most effective of the white-stemmed raspberries.