Rubus nepalensis (Hook. f.) O. Kuntze

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus nepalensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-nepalensis/). Accessed 2022-10-02.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. nutans var. nepalensis Hook. f.
  • R. nutans Wall. ex Edgew., not Vest
  • R. barbatus Edgew., nom. prov.
  • R. barbatus Edgew. ex Rehd., not Fritsch
  • R. nutantiflorus Hara

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
prostrate
Lying flat.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus nepalensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-nepalensis/). Accessed 2022-10-02.

An evergreen, prostrate shrub, rising only a few inches above the ground; the stems creeping, unarmed, but thickly covered with soft purplish bristles and rooting at almost every joint. Leaves trifoliolate, with bristly stalks 112 to 2 in. long; leaflets glossy green above, bristly on the veins beneath, sharply toothed, the terminal one the largest and from 1 to 212 in. long, rhomboidal, often rounded at the apex; the side ones half to two-thirds as large, all three very shortly stalked. Stipules toothed or laciniated. Flowers pure white, 112 in. across, borne in the leaf-axils and at the top of erect, leafy shoots 6 or 8 in. high, each flower on a slender stalk 112 to 212 in. long, bristly like the reddish calyx. Bot. Mag., t. 5023.

Native of the Himalaya; cultivated at Kew since the mid-19th century. The cheerful leaves and large flowers render this one of the most pleasing of dwarf Rubi. The plant is rare in gardens, but may be recommended as a low covering for sheltered semi-shaded slopes, etc.

R. nepalensis is a variable species. The plant described above agrees fairly well with the type of R. nutans – a name that has had to be discarded for nomenclatural reasons. Plants agreeing with the type of R. nepalensis, which is smaller in all its parts, are also in cultivation.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

Recent reintroductions of this species from Nepal are: by the University of North Wales Expedition (B.L. & M. 152); and Schilling 2074.


R fockeanus Kurz

Closely allied to the preceding, but with more slender stems which are hairy but not bristly, and entire stipules. It is of wider distribution than R. nepalensis, extending from the Himalaya to Western and Central China.