Rubus parviflorus Nutt.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus parviflorus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-parviflorus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Common Names

  • Thimbleberry

Synonyms

  • R. nutkanus Moçino ex Ser.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glandular
Bearing glands.
lobe
Division of a leaf or other object. lobed Bearing lobes.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus parviflorus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-parviflorus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

A vigorous deciduous shrub, up to 8 ft high, with erect, unarmed stems, and peeling bark; young shoots downy and slightly glandular. Leaves simple, five-lobed, vine-like, 4 to 8 (or more) in. across, irregularly toothed, downy on both sides especially beneath; leaf-stalk 2 to 5 in. long, set with glandular hairs. Flowers pure white, 112 to 2 in. across, borne three to ten in terminal clusters during June, and continuing for several weeks; the flower-stalk is glandular-hairy and the calyx is very downy, each lobe contracted at the apex into a short tail. Fruits large, hemispherical and flattened, red; said to be sometimes pleasantly flavoured in the wild. Bot. Mag., t. 3453.

Native of N. America and N. Mexico; introduced by Douglas in 1827. Very similar in its growth and foliage to R. odoratus, but easily distinguished by its white flowers in smaller clusters; the shoots, too, are not so conspicuously downy and glandular, and are darker coloured. Like that species it forms, when left to itself in good soil, dense thickets, which should be overhauled every winter and the worn-out stems cut out. Easily increased by pulling old plants to pieces. Fruits ripen most seasons from the earliest flowers, but are insipid and worthless in this country.