Rubus parvus J. Buchanan

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus parvus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-parvus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
cordate
Heart-shaped (i.e. with two equal lobes at the base).
androdioecious
With only male or only hermaphrodite flowers on individual plants.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
linear
Strap-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
prostrate
Lying flat.
unifoliolate
Having one leaflet thus appearing to have simple (not compound) leaves.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus parvus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-parvus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

An evergreen, unifoliolate, dioecious, prostrate shrub, the slender stems often partially buried in the soil and rooting from the joints; prickles few and small. The whole plant except the flower-stalks is glabrous. Leaves 1 to 3 in. long, 14 to 58 in. wide, linear to linear-lanceolate, more or less cordate, pointed, the margins densely and regularly set with small, sharp teeth; stalk 12 to 1 in. long, midrib sparsely spiny beneath. Flowers solitary or in twos or threes, axillary or terminal, white, about 1 in. wide, petals ovate, spreading.

Native of the South Island of New Zealand; in cultivation at Leonardslee, Sussex, in 1916. It is uncommon in gardens but used to be grown by Fred Stoker, who had a low patch several feet across in his garden in Essex, flowering in May and June. In a sunny position the dark green leaves are tinged with bronze, especially in winter, but they may be badly burned by prolonged frost.

With even more vividly tinted foliage is the hybrid R. × barkeri Ckn., discovered wild in Westland in 1898 and distributed by the New Zealand botanist Leonard Cockayne. The other parent is probably R. schmideloides, a New Zealand species not treated here. See further in Gard. Chron., Vol. 82 (1927), p. 405.; also in that excellent work L. J. Metcalf, The Cultivation of New Zealand Trees and Shrubs (1972), pp. 244-5, where R. parvus and the hybrid are both figured.