Rubus pedunculosus D. Don

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus pedunculosus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-pedunculosus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. gracilis Roxb., not Presl
  • R. niveus Wall., not Thunb.

Glossary

ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus pedunculosus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-pedunculosus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

A deciduous shrub, with very stout, erect, biennial stems, 1 to 112 in. thick and in vigorous plants 4 to 6 yards long, covered with a soft, thick, velvety down, and sprinkled over with minute prickles. Leaves 6 to over 12 in. long, composed of three or five leaflets. Side leaflets about half the size of the terminal one, stalkless or nearly so, obliquely ovate, coarsely and doubly toothed, slightly hairy above, covered with a close white felt beneath, and with silvery hairs on the veins; terminal leaflets ovate to roundish heart-shaped, long-stalked, from 3 to 5 in. long and wide, in other respects the same as the side ones. Flowers white or pale pink, 12 in. across, the petals shorter than the sepals. Fruits blue-black, small.

Native of the Himalaya and of W. and Central China, whence it was introduced about 1901. The Chinese plants are chiefly remarkable for their vigour; Wilson stated that it is occasionally 20 ft high. It is the most robust of all cultivated Rubi; hardy in Britain.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

The correct name for the Himalayan species once known as R. niveus Wall. ex G. Don is not R. pendunculosus but R. hypargus Edgeworth var. niveus (Wall. ex G. Don) Hara in Journ. Jap. Bot., Vol. 53, p. 137 (1978).

The wide-ranging R. niveus of Thunberg, described from Japan, also occurs in the Himalaya and appears in the Flora of British India under the synonymous name R. lasiocarpus Sm.