Rubus thibetanus Franch.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus thibetanus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-thibetanus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • R. veitchii Rolfe

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
leaflet
Leaf-like segment of a compound leaf.
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus thibetanus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-thibetanus/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

An erect deciduous shrub, 6 ft or more high; stems biennial, glabrous, round, covered with a purplish bloom, and set irregularly with straight, slender prickles. Leaves pinnate, 4 to 9 in. long, composed of seven to thirteen leaflets, the main-stalk prickly; leaflets oval or ovate, more or less oblique, stalkless, coarsely and angularly toothed, dark lustrous green, and with minutely silky hairs above, whitish felted beneath; the lowest leaflets are 1 to 2 in. long, each successive pair diminishing in size towards the apex of the leaf which is terminated by a long, deep-lobed leaflet. Flowers 12 in. across, slender-stalked, solitary in the leaf-axils, or a few together in terminal flattish panicles; the calyx very downy, with triangular lobes; petals purple. Fruits roundish, 58 in. across, black with a bluish bloom.

Native of W. China; discovered and introduced by Wilson for Messrs Veitch, with whom it flowered in August 1908. Wilson found it in the Min River Valley at elevations of 4,000 to 6,000 ft, where it is rare. Of the Chinese Rubi introduced in this century it is one of the most distinct and attractive-looking, both for its blue-purple stems and very handsomely cut foliage.