Rubus trifidus Thunb.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus trifidus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-trifidus/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corymb
Unbranched inflorescence with lateral flowers the pedicels of which are of different lengths making the inflorescence appear flat-topped.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rubus trifidus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rubus/rubus-trifidus/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

An evergreen or sub-evergreen shrub, with erect stems, 4 to 7 ft high, zigzagged towards the top, not (or but little) branched the first year, beset with glandular hairs at first, but soon becoming glabrous. Leaves dark lustrous green, usually five- or seven-lobed, 4 to 10 in. across; the lobes reach half or two-thirds of the way to the stalk, are ovate, pointed, doubly toothed, slightly hairy on the chief veins above and below; stalks 1 to 212 in. long. Flowers 1 to 114 in. wide, rosy-white, produced singly in the terminal leaf-axils and in a few-flowered, terminal corymb, each on a downy stalk 34 to 112 in. long. Calyx very downy outside. Fruits described as red and edible.

Native of Japan; introduced about 1888. This rubus is distinct from all other cultivated species in its large, handsome, deeply lobed leaves, which bear a great resemblance to those of Fatsia japonica, except that they are not so large. It is worth growing for their sake. The flowers, which appear in May are not freely borne, and I have never seen the fruit. The leaves of the flowering shoots are frequently three-lobed, and it is to them that the specific name refers.