Sabia latifolia Rehd. & Wils.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sabia latifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sabia/sabia-latifolia/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

Genus

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sabia latifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sabia/sabia-latifolia/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

A deciduous scandent shrub up to 10 ft high; young shoots soon glabrous, yellowish green or purplish. Leaves alternate, oval, oval-oblong or slightly obovate, base rounded to tapered, often abruptly pointed, toothless, 114 to 512 in. long, 34 to 3 in. wide, at first furnished with short hairs on both surfaces, eventually becoming glabrous except on the midrib and veins beneath; stalk 14 to 58 in. long, hairy. Flowers borne during May usually three together in axillary cymes 14 to 12 in. long, the stalks downy. Each flower is 14 in. wide, somewhat globose through the incurving of the five oval petals which are greenish yellow at first, changing to reddish brown, and edged with minute hairs. Sepals five, minute, roundish ovate, minutely ciliate; stamens rather longer than the petals. Fruits bright blue, consisting of two compressed, kidney-shaped parts attached to a slender stalk 34 to 1 in. long; each part of the fruit is 13 in. long. Bot, Mag., t. 8859.

Native of W. China; discovered by Pratt about 1888; introduced by Wilson in 1908. It was cultivated by Miss Willmott at Warley Place, Essex, where it became 10 ft high growing against a north wall. Here it flowered and ripened fruit in 1919. It is very rare.