Sabia schumanniana Diels

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sabia schumanniana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sabia/sabia-schumanniana/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Genus

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sabia schumanniana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sabia/sabia-schumanniana/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

A deciduous climber up to 10 ft high, with glabrous, slender young shoots. Leaves toothless, narrowly oblong to oval-lanceolate, slenderly pointed, shortly tapered to rounded at the base, 1 to 4 in. long, 13 to 112 in. wide, glabrous; stalk slender, 16 to 13 in. long. Flowers 14 in. long, cup-shaped, three to six in axillary cymes, with a slender main-stalk up to 112 in. long. Sepals small, rounded-triangular; petals greenish or dull purple, oval, blunt, 15 in. long; stamens about as long as the petals. Fruits kidney-shaped, 14 in. wide, blue-black, ripe in October, the sepals persisting at the base.

Native of W. China; introduced by Wilson in 1908. It differs from S. latifolia in its narrower, smaller, glabrous leaves and longer, more slender flower-stalks. It was introduced to Kew from the Arnold Arboretum in 1913 and has ripened fruit there. Quite hardy but of no great garden value. Flowers in May.