Salix candida Fluegge ex Willd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix candida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-candida/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

Genus

Common Names

  • Sage Willow

Synonyms

  • S. incana Michx., not Schrank

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
linear
Strap-shaped.
nectary
Gland or surface from which nectar is secreted.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.
tomentum
Dense layer of soft hairs. tomentose With tomentum.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix candida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-candida/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

A shrub up to 5 or 6 ft high of stiff, erect habit, the young shoots covered with a close, white wool. Leaves linear to narrow-oblong, tapered at both ends, 112 to 412 in. long, 18 to 78 in. wide, upper surface wrinkled, at first white with down which afterwards falls away, leaving it dull green, lower surface permanently covered with a thick tomentum of fine, matted hairs, margins decurved, obscurely toothed or entire; stalk 18 to 12 in. long. Stipules small and deciduous, except sometimes on strong shoots. Catkins produced in April as the leaves unfold, cylindric, densely flowered, almost sessile; scales pale brown. Male catkins about 1 in. long; stamens with free, glabrous filaments and purplish red anthers; nectary one. Female catkins 112 to 212 in. long in fruit; ovary downy, conic-ovoid, shortly stalked; style elongate, slender, reddish or purplish.

Native of North America from Labrador to British Columbia, south to Philadelphia, Iowa and Colorado; introduced in 1811. This distinct and hardy species is worth growing for the vivid whiteness of its young leaves.

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