Santolina

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Santolina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/santolina/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

Family

  • Compositae

Glossary

herbarium
A collection of preserved plant specimens; also the building in which such specimens are housed.
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Santolina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/santolina/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

Two or three species of Santolina are not uncommon in cultivation. They are plants with semi-woody stems, strong-scented when crushed, and with yellow flower-heads composed of very numerous small florets, and without the ray florets common to so many plants of this family. They are of very easy cultivation, growing best in full sun in any soil that is well drained and not too rich. Cuttings taken about July, put in pots of sandy soil and placed in heat, root in a few days. All of them are seen at their best in a comparatively young state, and are apt to become shabby with age. S. chamaecyparissus is valuable for planting in masses on the front of a shrubbery, both for its whiteness and for its abundant blossom.

Footnotes

Revised by C. Jeffrey, of the Herbarium, The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.