Santolina rosmarinifolia L.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Santolina rosmarinifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/santolina/santolina-rosmarinifolia/). Accessed 2022-05-18.

Genus

Common Names

  • Holy Flax

Synonyms

  • S. viridis Willd.
  • S. virens Mill.

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Santolina rosmarinifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/santolina/santolina-rosmarinifolia/). Accessed 2022-05-18.

An evergreen bush 112 to 2 ft high; stems glabrous, green. Leaves deep green, glabrous, the largest 1 to 2 in. long, about 18 in. wide, very similar in structure to those of the preceding species but with the teeth or projections more distant, forward-pointing or sometimes wanting. Flower-heads bright yellow, 34 in. across, produced in July singly at the end of slender, erect, glabrous stalks 6 to 10 in. long.

Native of southern France, Spain and Portugal; in cultivation 1727. An attractive species, with foliage of a rich deep green. The plant is not quite as dense in growth, nor quite so hardy, as S. chamaecyparissus. The leaves emit an odour when rubbed, but it is neither so strong nor so pleasant as that of the latter species.


'Primrose Gem'

Flowers pale primrose-yellow.subsp. canescens (Lag.) Nyman S. canescens Lag.; S. pectinata Lag., not Benth. – Like the typical subspecies, but stems finely downy and the leaves pinnate, with linear, more crowded, laterally spreading lobes. Native of southern Spain.