Sapindus drummondii Hook. & Arn.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sapindus drummondii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sapindus/sapindus-drummondii/). Accessed 2022-05-19.

Genus

Common Names

  • Wild China-tree

Synonyms

  • S. saponaria var. drummondii (Hook. & Arn.) Benson

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    berry
    Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    globose
    globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
    lanceolate
    Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
    midrib
    midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
    imparipinnate
    Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

    References

    There are no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Sapindus drummondii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sapindus/sapindus-drummondii/). Accessed 2022-05-19.

    A deciduous tree up to 40 or 50 ft high, with scaling bark; young shoots warted, slightly downy. Leaves alternate, pinnate, 10 to 15 in. long, made up of eight to eighteen leaflets which are lanceolate, slenderly pointed, tapered and often oblique at the base, not toothed, 112 to 312 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide, rather pale green and glabrous above, downy beneath when young especially at the base of the midrib. Flowers yellowish white, 16 in. wide, produced during June on pyramidal terminal panicles 6 or 8 in. long; sepals narrowly triangular; petals obovate, downy inside; stamens hairy, eight or ten. Fruits about 12 in. wide, nearly globose, described as having a thin, dark, orange-coloured, semi-translucent flesh; they ultimately turn black.

    Native of the southern United States, especially towards the west, and of N. Mexico; introduced to Britain in 1915. It is quite hardy but of little ornamental value. The popular name derives from a fancied resemblance between this species and Melia azederach, known as the China-tree or China-berry in the southern USA, where it is much cultivated.