Sarcobatus vermiculatus (Hook.) Torr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sarcobatus vermiculatus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sarcobatus/sarcobatus-vermiculatus/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Common Names

  • Grease Wood

Synonyms

  • Batis (?) vermiculatus Hook.
  • S. maximilianii Nees

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    lax
    Loose or open.
    linear
    Strap-shaped.
    spike
    Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.
    unisexual
    Having only male or female organs in a flower.

    References

    There are no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Sarcobatus vermiculatus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sarcobatus/sarcobatus-vermiculatus/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

    A deciduous shrub of lax habit, 6 to 9 ft high, more in diameter, making a dense thicket of stems, arching and spreading at the top; twigs angular, whitish, spine-tipped, usually glabrous. Leaves alternate, linear, 12 to 112 in. long, 116 to 18 in. wide, grey, rather fleshy, stalkless. Flowers small, greenish, unisexual; males crowded in a spike 12 to 1 in. long at the end of short lateral twigs, females appearing singly in the axils of the lower leaves of the same twig. Neither has any beauty, but they are interesting botanically. The male flower has neither calyx nor corolla, the stamens, about three in number, being arranged at the base of curious cup-like scales. The female flower is also without a corolla, but has a calyx which persists and enlarges and ultimately develops into a thin, papery disk, prominently veined, 14 to 13 in. across, with the seeds in the middle.

    Native of the dry, alkaline, and saline regions of western N. America; introduced to Kew in 1896 but is no longer there. Like other shrubs from the same regions, it thrives quite well in ordinary garden soil. It flowers in July, but, as may be judged from the description, is of more botanical than horticultural interest.