Sargentodoxa cuneata (Oliver) Rehd. & Wils.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sargentodoxa cuneata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sargentodoxa/sargentodoxa-cuneata/). Accessed 2022-05-28.

Synonyms

  • Holboellia cuneata Oliver

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    berry
    Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
    carpel
    Female reproductive organ of a flower. Composed of ovary style and stigma. Typically several carpels are fused together in each flower (syncarpous). The number of them can be of taxonomic significance; it can often be assessed by counting the stigma branches or the chambers in the fruit.
    cone
    Term used here primarily to indicate the seed-bearing (female) structure of a conifer (‘conifer’ = ‘cone-producer’); otherwise known as a strobilus. A number of flowering plants produce cone-like seed-bearing structures including Betulaceae and Casuarinaceae.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    leaflet
    Leaf-like segment of a compound leaf.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
    keel petal
    (in the flowers of some legumes) The two front petals fused together to form a keel-like structure.
    unisexual
    Having only male or female organs in a flower.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Sargentodoxa cuneata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sargentodoxa/sargentodoxa-cuneata/). Accessed 2022-05-28.

    A unisexual, twining, deciduous climber 25 ft or more high; young shoots glabrous. Leaves dark glossy green, alternate, glabrous, composed of three leaflets borne on a common stalk 2 to 4 in. long. Side leaflets stalkless, obliquely ovate (or like a heart-shaped leaf halved lengthwise), pointed, up to 412 in. long, half as much wide; middle leaflet obovate, oval, or lozenge-shaped, smaller than the side ones and on a stalk 12 in. long. Male flowers greenish yellow, fragrant, borne numerously in pendulous racemes 4 to 6 in. long; each flower has six petal-like, narrowly oblong sepals 12 in. long, 18 in. wide, and is borne on a stalk 12 to 34 in. long; stamens six. Female flowers (borne on separate plants) also in pendulous racemes up to 4 in. long, with six similar greenish yellow, petal-like sepals, and the carpels crowded on a central cone 14 in. high. When these carpels mature each develops into a roundish dark purplish blue ‘berry’ 14 in. wide, carrying a single black seed and borne on a stalk from 14 to 12 in. long. This stalk is the elongated base of the carpel. Bot. Mag., t. 9111, 9112.

    Native of Central China; discovered by Henry about 1887; introduced by Wilson in 1907. It first flowered in this country with C. J. Lucas at Warnham Court, Horsham, in May 1922. It may need the protection of a wall in many places. In the shape of its leaflets it is distinct from any other hardy climbing shrub except Sinofranchetia, to which it has much resemblance.