Sasa tessellata (Munro) Makino & Shibata

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sasa tessellata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sasa/sasa-tessellata/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Bambusa tessellata Munro
  • B. ragamowskii Nichols.
  • Arundinaria tessellata (Munro) E. G. Camus
  • A. ragamowskii (Nichols.) Pfitzer

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
spike
Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sasa tessellata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sasa/sasa-tessellata/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

Stems 4 to 6 ft high, 18 to 16 in. diameter, with a very small hollow up the centre; the joints 1 to 3 in. apart. Stem-sheath persistent, 8 to 10 in. long, clasping not only that part of the stem above the joint from which it springs, but also portions of the two or three stem-sheaths above it; it is fringed with hairs. Leaves somewhat ribbed, of varying size, the largest 18 in. long, and 3 to 4 in. wide in the middle, abruptly tapered at the base, very slenderly pointed, dark green above, glaucous beneath. The larger leaves have fifteen to eighteen secondary veins at each side the midrib, which is yellow; and tucked under one side of the midrib, especially towards the base, is a line of pale hairs.

Native of China; cultivated in England since 1845, probably before. It is the most striking of dwarf bamboos, with larger leaves than any other, tall or dwarf, and forms broad, rounded masses, the outer stems of which arch outwards to the ground, and out of which spring each summer the spike-like new growths. It has never been known to flower under cultivation. Very hardy. It differs from S. palmata in the dwarfer habit but larger leaves.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

In European Garden Flora, loc. cit., this is treated under the name Indocalamus tessellatus (Munro) Keng. The genus Indocalamus differs from Sasa primarily in floral characters.