Schizophragma

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Schizophragma' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/schizophragma/). Accessed 2022-05-28.

Family

  • Hydrangeaceae

Glossary

bract
Reduced leaf often subtending flower or inflorescence.
cyme
Branched determinate inflorescence with a flower at the end of each branch. cymose In the form of a cyme.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
perfect
(botanical) All parts present and functional. Usually referring to both androecium and gynoecium of a flower.
section
(sect.) Subdivision of a genus.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Schizophragma' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/schizophragma/). Accessed 2022-05-28.

Two climbing deciduous shrubs, found in China and Japan, and very nearly allied to Hydrangea – especially the climbing section of that genus. Leaves opposite, long-stalked. Flowers in a large terminal cyme, the central flowers small and perfect, the outer ones sterile and reduced to one large showy bract borne at the end of a slender stalk. From Hydrangea, the only other genus with which it can be confused, Schizophragma differs in the sterile flowers consisting of but one bract instead of four, and in having the four or five styles united into one. The specialised function of the large bracts, is, no doubt, to attract insects to the inflorescence, and thereby bring about the fertilisation of the flowers. In the great majority of flowers each one does its own share in adversisement. Fruits top-shaped.

These two shrubs are easily cultivated. They like a good loamy soil and plenty of moisture, and can be increased by cuttings and layers. The only other necessity is something for them to climb over, and this may be wall, tree-trunk, or anything to which the aerial roots may attach themselves.