Shepherdia canadensis (L.) Nutt.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Shepherdia canadensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/shepherdia/shepherdia-canadensis/). Accessed 2022-05-28.

Synonyms

  • Hippophae canadensis L.

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Shepherdia canadensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/shepherdia/shepherdia-canadensis/). Accessed 2022-05-28.

A deciduous, unarmed shrub, up to 6 or 8 ft high, of bushy habit; shoots covered with brownish scales. Leaves ovate or oval, 12 to 2 in. long, 14 to 1 in. wide, dull dark green above, and at first furnished with silvery starry tufts of hairs especially along the midrib and veins; the under-surface woolly and specked with numerous brownish scales; stalk 18 to 16 in. long. Fruits yellowish red, egg-shaped, 14 in. long.

Native of N. America, where it is widely spread both in the United States and Canada; in cultivation 1759. I have seen this shrub growing wild on the cliffs of the Genesee River gorge in New York State, between Rochester and Lake Ontario, loaded with its beautiful reddish fruits in July; but in England they are rarely developed. The shrub is interesting, and the singular aspect of the under-surface of the leaf under the lens is worth notice, the thick basis of silvery hair-tufts being interspersed with brown scales, each scale with a dark, glistening, eye-like centre.