Sinowilsonia

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sinowilsonia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sinowilsonia/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Family

  • Hamamelidaceae

Species in genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
unisexual
Having only male or female organs in a flower.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sinowilsonia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sinowilsonia/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Like many genera of the Witch Hazel family, Sinowilsonia consists of a single species. Leaves alternate, deciduous, pinnately veined. Flowers without petals, unisexual, inconspicuous, the males in leafless catkin-like racemes, with five sepals and five stamens. Females with a stellately downy receptacle (calyx-tube) which encloses the ovary and is surmounted by five spreading sepals; they are arranged in racemes which are terminal on leafy shoots and at first about 1 in. long, greatly lengthening as the fruits ripen. The fruit is a capsule, partly enclosed by the receptacle and containing numerous black seeds.

The genus is named after the famous plant collector E. H. Wilson, who collected some of the specimens from which the genus was described, and introduced its one species.