Smilax scobinicaulis C. H. Wright

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Smilax scobinicaulis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/smilax/smilax-scobinicaulis/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
type specimen
A herbarium specimen cited in a taxonomic account to define a particular species or other taxon.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Smilax scobinicaulis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/smilax/smilax-scobinicaulis/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

A deciduous climber growing 15 ft or more high; branches slender, grooved, often very densely furnished with numerous black prickles, often unarmed. Leaves ovate to ovate-oblong, rounded or slightly heart-shaped at the base, finely pointed, five- or seven-veined, 3 to 5 in. long, 1 to 3 in. wide, glabrous and green on both surfaces; stalk 14 to 38 in. long, with tendrils attached to it near the blade. Flowers yellowish white, borne in axillary umbels 34 in. wide, the main-stalk of which is 13 in. long, the individual stalks 18 to 14 in. long. Fruits globose, black, 14 in. wide, in clusters of nine to twelve, each containing one to three seeds.

Native of Central China; discovered by Henry; introduced by Wilson in 1907. The original type specimen collected in Hupeh by A. Henry about 1888, on which Wright founded the species, has the stem practically covered with the slender, bristle-like spines he described. Plants at Kew, however, raised from Wilson’s seeds in 1908, had fairly stiff spines sprinkled freely over the stems but no bristle-like ones. The fruits, too, were much smaller. Wilson’s No. 627 is certainly true but Nos. 455, 671, and 680, which have also been called S. scobinicaulis, seem to be distinct.