Solanum

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Solanum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/solanum/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Family

  • Solanaceae

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
berry
Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
cone
Term used here primarily to indicate the seed-bearing (female) structure of a conifer (‘conifer’ = ‘cone-producer’); otherwise known as a strobilus. A number of flowering plants produce cone-like seed-bearing structures including Betulaceae and Casuarinaceae.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
linear
Strap-shaped.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.
umbel
Inflorescence in which pedicels all arise from same point on peduncle. May be flat-topped (as in e.g. Umbelliferae) to spherical (as in e.g. Araliaceae). umbellate In form of umbel.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Solanum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/solanum/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

A genus of around 1500 species, most of them herbaceous or semi-woody. Leaves simple or compound, sometimes solitary, more usually in cymose clusters arranged in the form of an umbel, raceme or panicle. Corolla star-shaped or rotate, five-lobed. Stamens five, the filaments short, inserted in the mouth of the corolla, the anthers long, leaning inwards and forming a cone. Fruit a many-seeded berry.

Apart from the species treated below, a few others with more or less woody stems are sometimes cultivated. Of the native bittersweet S. dulcamara L. there is a variegated form rather handsomely variegated with clear creamy white. The soft semiwoody shoots grow 6 to 8 ft high, but die back very much in winter, only the base being woody. The red berries are poisonous, so the plant is not desirable where there are children. The flowers are violet blue, and the leaves are frequently unequally lobed at the base. S. laciniatum Ait. f. of Australia (and of New Zealand according to some authorities) bears lanceolate or linear-lanceolate entire or pinnately lobed leaves up to 6 in. or so long, both forms appearing on the same plant. The bluish purple flowers are up to 2 in. wide, the fruits egg-shaped, orange-yellow, with conspicuous stone-cells in the flesh. It is a rather tender, soft-wooded plant attaining 10 ft or so (Bot. Mag., t. 9154). S. aviculare Forst. f. of New Zealand (and probably Australia) is similar but less ornamental; the two are sometimes united under the name S. aviculare.